Tag Archives: censorship

Interesting stuff from December 19th through January 23rd

The periodic round up:

  • Knock, knock, it’s the future (Building 59) – What’s behind SOPA/PIPA is a small group of large businesses whose business model is disappearing. Like Kodak, they are trying to ignore the future. Like Kodak, they may find that it is an exercise in futility and the road to failure …
  • A New Style of Work – This is not only pretty much how I work these days, it’s also the future for more and more of us. As conventional “careers” disappear into organisational restructures, those who can will trend towards the “distributed” working style. When you get there, give me a call – there’s a few of you I’d be happy to work with again :)
  • How Pursuit of Profits Kills Innovation and the U.S. Economy – … or any other economy for that matter. So outsourcing makes you profitable – what happens when somebody else does everything for your business? What reason do you have for it existing? This is one of the insidious results of a fascination with economic profit to the exclusion of other types of value, and also of only using percentage-type measures. Making your customers’ lives better will keep you in business longer and better than just chasing internally-focussed profit measure.
  • The Rise of Developeronomics – Know any good software developers? Invest in them. Whether you realise it or not, your company is a software company, regardless of what you are making as a product. And those tame developers you have?: “In most non-software companies, developers have so far accepted a sort of second-class-citizen status despite their increasing scarcity and increasingly critical roles. That is about to change.” Developers – the new kingmakers …
  • The City Solution – How to handle a rising population? Urbanise … National Geographic on the benefits of big cities
  • Don’t Break the Internet – Stanford Law Review – A reasoned view of the dangers inherent in SOPA and PROTECT-IP which also points out the irony of the USA taking censorship on the internet further than the repressive regimes it has criticised in the past

 

Interesting stuff from July 11th through July 18th

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The weekly round up:

 

  • Refuse to be Terrorized – This post is nearly five years old … have we learnt anything yet? The object of terrorism is causing fear, and our governments and press do a better job of it than most terrorists. Yes, it’s a risk … but it’s a tiny portion of the risk we face every day, so let’s get a reasonable perspective on it.

 

 

 

 

  • Rebecca MacKinnon: Let’s take back the Internet! – In this TEDGlobal talk from Edinburgh July 2011, the intermediary role the Internet plays between people and their governments is explored, with some warning that we as yet haven’t had the Internet’s “Magna Carta” moment, and we don’t yet run the Internet with the “consent of the networked”. We’re missing the political mechanisms that would ensure that governments and technology work for the benefit of the public on the web.

 

 

 

 

  • The Future of companies & the modern workforce – A video conversation with John Hagel about the future of companies and workforce. Takeaways:
    • after decades of making our supply chains efficient via reduction of supply partnerships, deeper trust-based relationships with possibly many more partners will lead to greater agility and specialisation.
    • large companies are still necessary where there are large infrastructure requirements, but many small companies will be able to flexibly scale via loosely-coupled partnerships brokered over the internet
    • the next decade will see increasing pressure on companies that maintain an industrial-age business model that emphasises efficiency over effectiveness and agility

 

 

  • Why a Rise in M.B.A.s Coincided with the Fall of American Industry – What happens when senior management becomes more and more abstracted from the business’ product(s). In the end people deal with the things they are most comfortable with, and ultimately MBAs deal with finances and organisational structures … not the product; so the product suffers. When that happens, all the case studies in the world can’t help you. Who is more interested in products? Engineers …