The weekly round up:

     

  • Reinventing the Technology of Human Accomplishment – Think about it – the management tools we still use today were almost all developed at the end of the 19th century (you know … 120 years ago!). The problem those tools were designed to fix: how do we turn human beings into semi-programmable robots? How do we make them repeat the same action over and over again?
    These aren’t the problems businesses have today (we actually HAVE robots to do those tasks now!). As Gary Hamel points out in this video, businesses need flexibility, adaptability and innovation to keep up with accelerating change … these are the very things our management styles make difficult. The first change has to come in our management tools and models …
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  • David Eagleman and Mysteries of the Brain – Do you ever get the feeling there’s a whole lot of clocks ticking different beats in your head? You may not be so crazy after all – this is a real interesting take on how we perceive time and why …
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  • Why Telstra is wrong on VoIP – Internode boss Simon Hackett gives Telstra a well-deserved serve for their attempt to put lipstick on their VoIP pig. This sort of exercise from Telstra (and they have prior form as well) is an example of the need for structural separation of wholesale network provision and retail competition – now Telstra might have to innovate for real.
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  • Software and the Complexity Excuse – Given that software is just an abstracted model of business (and life!) complexity, perhaps instead of complaining about how complex our business is, we should be looking harder for a better, simpler model
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  • The Great Ephemeralization – Among other things, this post highlights that increasingly our existing measurements of prosperity (in this case GDP) are inadequate and misleading. All the examples mentioned represent a DECREASE in GDP, but an INCREASE in quality of life – so we become better off and live better while production drops – how do we measure that? Certainly GDP doesn’t cut the mustard any more …
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