The weekly round up:

     

  • A Customer Liberation Manifesto (PDF) – A bit of a meaty read, but has some interesting points to make about how how we should (and probably don’t) treat customers. It contrasts the familiar customer relationship management idea (CRM) with “customer manages the relationship” (CMR) – noting that most CRM activity isn’t REALLY designed to help the relationship, but to maximise the vendor’s profitable exploitation of that relationship. That’s not customer service … 

    And who knew there was such a thing as “service science”?

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  • Our Time Is Not Our Own: Time Is The New Space – If you’re in a job that is measured by results, but you’re being judged by time, you’re probably in the wrong place. Most “knowledge work” (an increasing percentage of all jobs) succeeds when a particular set of outcomes is achieved – which may have very little to do with where and how you spend your “working” time, rather than some repetitive machine-like activity between 9am and 5pm.
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  • Wikipedia And The Death Of The Expert – How does the Internet change the way we learn? Is expertise dead? Or do we just view it and use it differently these days? Knowledge is being recognised as provisional, not final; and reached via polylogue rather than decree.
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  • Come on Chardy, let’s go party – Chardonnay Day | Thoughtpool – My write-up of the #chardonnay party with the Qwoff Boys. Who says chardonnay is passé?
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  • The Pull of Narrative – In Search of Persistent Context – In a world of accelerating information flow, abbreviated communications and increasing content choices, persistent narratives which provide context are becoming more important as a means to finding sense in the noise. This post also touches on the importance of finding new narratives, rather than reverting to old but comfortable ones like fundamentalism and nationalism, the divisive effects of which will also be amplified.
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  • A Hippocratic oath for the internet – An impassioned plea from Jeff Jarvis to the eG8 summit called by Sarkozy (seemingly an attempt to strengthen government control over the internet; more of a pandering to old business models; neither aim is particularly good for citizens) to stay away from the internet. As Jarvis says: “Sarkozy called this meeting to discuss the growth of the internet. It will grow only if it is open and free.”
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